Citations

Chapter 7

Dietary Habits for a Long and Healthy Life: Building a Better Bowl

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These gems contain polyacetylenes, an unusual class of organic compounds: Christian Zidorn, et al., “Polyacetylenes from the Apiaceae Vegetables Carrot, Celery, Fennel, Parsley, and Parsnip and Their Cytotoxic Activities,” J Agric Food Chem 54, no. 7 (April 2005): 2518–23. doi: 10.1021/jf048041s.

Research demonstrates cilantro has a synergistic effect with chlorella for heavy metal detoxification: See Aliasghar Rahimian and Reza Mehrandish, “Heavy Metals Detoxification: A Review of Herbal Compounds for Chelation Therapy in Heavy Metals Toxicity,” Journal of Herbmed Pharmacology 8, no. 2 (April 2019): 69–77. doi: 10.15171/jhp.2019.12.

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Cancer research has found cruciferous vegetables, including brussels sprouts, to have positive influences: See the American Institute for Cancer Research’s entry on Brussels sprouts at https://www.aicr.org/cancer-prevention/food-facts/brussels-sprouts/.

they also contain an antioxidant called “cucurbitacin”: See Ujjwal Kaushik, Vidhu Aeri, and Showkat R. Mir, “Cucurbitacins – An Insight into Medicinal Leads from Nature,” Pharmacogn Rev 9, no. 17 (January–June 2015): 12–18. doi: 10.4103/0973-7847.156314.

the richest vegetable source of lutein and zeaxanthin: M. El-Sayed, et al., “Dietary Sources of Lutein and Zeaxanthin Carotenoids and Their Role in Eye Health,” Nutrients 5, no. 4 (April 2013): 1169–85. doi: 10.3390/nu5041169.

“a deficiency in folate is equivalent to standing under ionizing radiation due to the DNA damage it causes”: See Dr. Rhonda Patrick’s podcast interview on the Tim Ferris Show, “Exploring Smart Drugs, Fasting, and Fat Loss—Dr. Rhonda Patrick (#237)” on May 4, 2017.

folate has also been shown to play a role in protecting telomeres: See Wen Li, et al., “Folic Acid Decreases Astrocyte Apoptosis by Preventing Oxidative Stress-Induced Telomere Attrition,” Int J Mol Sci 21, no. 1 (December 2019): 62. doi: 10.3390/ijms21010062. Also see Jane Katherine Murray, et al., “ ‘Generation Pup’ – Protocol for a Longitudinal Study of Dog Behavior and Health,” BMC Vet Res 17, no. 1 (January 2021): 1. doi: 10.1186/s12917-020-02730-8.

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Dr. Patrick praises broccoli sprouts as being “very powerful for anti-aging”: See Rhonda Patrick’s website and gallery of interviews at https://www.foundmyfitness.com/.

Sprouts are the best way to remove AGEs from your dog’s body: See Thomas W Sedlak, et al., “Sulforaphane Augments Glutathione and Influences Brain Metabolites in Human Subjects: A Clinical Pilot Study,” Mol Neuropsychiatry 3, no. 4 (May 2018): 214–22. doi: 10.1159/000487639. Epub 2018 Apr 17. Also see “Broccoli Sprouts Oppose Effects of Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs)” entry at SurfaceYourRealSelf.com on April 17, 2020, https://surfaceyourrealself.com/2020/04/17/broccoli-sprouts-oppose-effects-of-advanced-glycation-end-products-ages/.

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mushrooms contain a variety of longevity-promoting substances: For a great review of medicinal mushrooms with links to studies, visit the North American Mycological Association at https://namyco.org/scientific_research_and_medici.php.

“In human terms, that would mean instead of living to about 81 years old, the average American could live to be over 100”: See The Age-Well Project’s post on November 3, 2017, “Why You Need More Spermidine … And Why We Still Love Cheese,” https://agewellproject.com/need-spermidine-still-love-cheese/. Also see Leyuan Liu, et al., “Spermidine Prolongs Lifespan and Prevents Liver Fibrosis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Activating MAP1S-mediated Autophagy,” Cancer Research 77 no. 11 (2017): 2938–51. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-3462. Epub 2017 Apr 6.

when turkey tail mushroom was added as a sole form of treatment: See Dorothy Cimino Brown and Jennifer Reetz, “Single Agent Polysaccharopeptide Delays Metastases and Improves Survival in Naturally Occurring Hemangiosarcoma,” Evid Based Complement Alternat Med2012 (2012): 384301. doi: 10.1155/2012/384301. Epub 2012 Sep 5.

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One of the star probiotics making headlines in the dog space is Akkermansia muciniphila: See Maria C. Jugan, et al., “Effects of Oral Akkermansia muciniphila Supplementation in Healthy Dogs Following Antimicrobial Administration,” Am J Vet Res 79, no. 8 (August 2018): 884–92. doi: 10.2460/ajvr.79.8.884. Also see: Jose F Garcia-Mazcorro, et al., “Akkermansia and Microbial Degradation of Mucus in Cats and Dogs: Implications to the Growing Worldwide Epidemic of Pet Obesity,” Vet Sci 7, no. 2 (April 2020): 44. doi: 10.3390/vetsci7020044.

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Do cruciferous veggies cause low thyroid?: For an extensive review of cruciferous vegetables with a library of references, see Oregon State University’s entry on Cruciferous Vegetables at the Linus Pauling Institute’s Micronutrient Information Center at https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/food-beverages/cruciferous-vegetables#reference54.

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Forever Dog Fruits: As noted above, Oregon State University’s Linus Pauling Institute maintains a Micronutrient Information Center that catalogs foods and beverages with extensive research referenced. It’s a great place to find general data and facts: https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/food-beverages.

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mice exposed to fisetin lived 10 percent longer and experienced less age-related issues than the control group, even at an older age: See Matthew J. Yousefzadeh, et al., “Fisetin Is a Senotherapeutic that Extends Health and Lifespan,” EBioMedicine 36 (October 2018): 18–28. doi: 10.1016/j.ebiom.2018.09.015. Epub 2018 Sep 29.

feeding pomegranate extract to a dog has incredible protective heart and health benefits: See Christophe Ripoll, et al., “Evaluation of Natural Substances’ Protective Effects Against Oxidative Stress in a Newly Developed Canine Endothelial Cell-Based Assay and in Cell-Free Radical Scavenging Assays,” International Journal of Applied Research in Veterinary Medicine 10, no. 2 (2012): 113–24.

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increasing their lifespan by more than 45 percent: See Dongryeol Ryu, et al., “Urolithin A Induces Mitophagy and Prolongs Lifespan in C. elegansand Increases Muscle Function in Rodents,” Nat Med 22, no. 8 (August 2016): 879–88. doi: 10.1038/nm.4132. Epub 2016 Jul 11.

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Herbs for Health Span: For a general overview of these herbs’ potential health benefits, see T. A. Jiang, “Health Benefits of Culinary Herbs and Spices,” J AOAC Int 102, no. 2 (March 2019): 395–411. doi: 10.5740/jaoacint.18-0418. Epub 2019 Jan 16. PMID: 30651162.

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stimulates glutathione production (needed to clear AGEs from the body): See C. Ott, et al., “Role of Advanced Glycation End Products in Cellular Signaling,” Redox Biol 9, no. 2 (January 2014): 411–29. doi: 10.1016/j.redox.2013.12.016. PMID: 24624331; PMCID: PMC3949097.

parsley’s volatile oils can raise the free radical–quenching: See A. Wei and T. Shibamoto, “Antioxidant Activities and Volatile Constituents of Various Essential Oils,” J Agric Food Chem 55, no. 5 (March 2007): 1737–42. doi: 10.1021/jf062959x. Epub 2007 Feb 13. PMID: 17295511.

The medical literature exploring the efficacy of curcumin, the most active polyphenol in the Indian spice turmeric (pronounce “too”-meric), continues to explode: See S. J. Hewlings and D. S. Kalman, “Curcumin: A Review of Its Effects on Human Health,” Foods 6, no. 10 (October 2017): 92. doi: 10.3390/foods6100092. PMID: 29065496; PMCID: PMC5664031.

by targeting biochemical pathways in dogs associated with neurodegenerative disorders, including cognitive impairments, energy/fatigue, mood, and anxiety: See Sara Sechi, et al., “An Antioxidant Dietary Supplement Improves Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Serum of Aged Dogs: Preliminary Results,” Journal of Veterinary Medicine 2015 (2015): 412501. doi:10.1155/2015/412501.

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turmeric’s promise in decreasing ocular inflammation in dogs suffering from uveitis: See “Turmeric and Canine Uveitis: Not So Far-Fetched,” Texas A&M Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences CVMBS News, August 27, 2020, https://vetmed.tamu.edu/news/pet-talk/turmeric-and-canine-uveitis-not-so-far-fetched/.

Ethnobotanist James Duke published a meta-study of over seven hundred turmeric studies and concluded: See James A. (Jim) Duke “The Garden Pharmacy: Turmeric, the Queen of COX-2-Inhibitors,” Alternative and Complementary Therapies 13, no. 5 (November 2007): 229–34.

This herb is being investigated as the “spice of life”: See S. Habtemariam, “The Therapeutic Potential of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) Diterpenes for Alzheimer’s Disease,” Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2016 (2016): 2680409. doi: 10.1155/2016/2680409. Epub 2016 Jan 28. PMID: 26941822; PMCID: PMC4749867.

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cinnamon improved all tested heart parameters in dogs after only two weeks: See Ramin Elahi, “The Effect of the Cinnamon on Dog’s Heart Performance by Focus on Korotkoff Sounds,” Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances 11, no. 19 (December 2012): 3604–8.

cloves’ anticancer and antibacterial properties with promising results: See H. Liu, et al., “Clove Extract Inhibits Tumor Growth and Promotes Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis,” Oncol Res 21, no. 5 (2014): 247–59.

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Forever Fluids: Multiple institutions maintain pages covering the health benefits and current studies on teas. See Harvard’s School of Public Health “The Nutrition Source” at https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/food-features/tea/. Or, try the health blogs at Penn Medicine, https://www.pennmedicine.org/updates/blogs/health-and-wellness.